Archive for ‘August, 2011

SHOWS IN OUR BEHAVIOURS



Mark’s Daily Thought – Ideas from Mark Fritz to help you Get Ahead, Stay Ahead and Be Successful

People often say to others…"I wish I could tell what you are thinking". You know, we can’t read their minds, but we can observe their behaviours; (and how people behave reveals what they are thinking). Successful leaders learn a great deal about what their people are thinking by observing their behaviours.

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VISIT THERE IN THEIR MINDS FIRST

Mark’s Daily Thought – Ideas from Mark Fritz to help you Get Ahead, Stay Ahead and Be Successful

Successful people in all areas of life visit their success in their minds before they achieve it in their life. Visualisation is a key factor to the achievement of every successful person, and it’s always something that the unsuccessful think they just don’t have the time to do.

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SO SMART THEY STOP LISTENING

Mark’s Daily Thought – Ideas from Mark Fritz to help you Get Ahead, Stay Ahead and Be Successful

Is there such a thing as being too smart? Maybe so…if how you think and what you know stops you from listening. It is by listening that we expand our thinking and grow the most. Therefore, people who feel they are smart enough will stop listening to others (and stop growing too).

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HAVING DONE YOUR HOMEWORK

Mark’s Daily Thought – Ideas from Mark Fritz to help you Get Ahead, Stay Ahead and Be Successful

People who appear confident are often the ones who have done their homework. Being confident in the key moments is really created by the preparation that was done beforehand. Doing your homework and being prepared gives you the confidence to adapt quickly in the moment in order to gain what you want.

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WOULD IT IMPRESS YOUR CUSTOMERS?

Mark’s Daily Thought – Ideas from Mark Fritz to help you Get Ahead, Stay Ahead and Be Successful

There are so many activities needed in running a successful business, and often as businesses grow, some unnecessary activities grow too. A great question to evaluate business activities could be…Would it impress your customers if they saw your organisation doing these activities?

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Best Public Speaking Training Tips: Confidence is the main aim.

  • Tuesday Aug 16,2011 04:47 PM
  • By External Author
  • In Tips & Tricks

www.changingtools.com PPF is a great technique that will help you everytime someone asks you your opinion.

Superficial analysis and the wrong interventions

Max Blumberg

Labour opposition leader Ed Milliband says the UK needs a proper, deep analysis into the real causes of the recent riots. But Prime Minister David Cameron says the UK knows the causes and all that is needed now is rapid action and intervention to prevent recurrence. Milliband responds to this by saying that this means Cameron’s intervention will simply be a knee-jerk reaction based on a superficial analysis of the situation, and which will result in the wrong intervention and not cure the rioting.

As diagnostic analysts, we see this situation almost daily in complex organisations. We hear about their problems finding the right employees, and how they spend a fortune on development, engagement and retention, but without the results they were hoping for. But when we offer to perform a formal diagnostic to identify the root causes of the problem, there is inevitably a Cameron in the company who tells us the answer is obvious and then proceeds with an intervention. Nine times out of ten, we’re back there within two years.

It is true that in non-complex organisations, the causes of problems are indeed usually easy to identify. But in large, global, multi-cultural situations, they are not.

Why do people fear diagnostic analysis? Some possible reasons:

1. They cost money, it is true. But they are usually cheaper than applying the wrong intervention.

2. Some people get systematic problem analysis; others don’t. I notice this often based on the looks of awe that I get when explaining what to me seems like a simple systematic approach to, for example, identifying the causes of employee turnover. I often wonder why the client didn’t think of it themselves, but the fact is that many people do not think this way and find it difficult. I suppose it’s good because that creates opportunities for me.

Of course sometimes even formal diagnostics can get it wrong, but one thing is for sure: they get it wrong less often and cost much less than superficial guesses about the underlying causes.

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Superficial analysis and the wrong interventions

Max Blumberg

Labour opposition leader Ed Milliband says the UK needs a proper, deep analysis into the real causes of the recent riots. But Prime Minister David Cameron says the UK knows the causes and all that is needed now is rapid action and intervention to prevent recurrence. Milliband responds to this by saying that this means Cameron’s intervention will simply be a knee-jerk reaction based on a superficial analysis of the situation, and which will result in the wrong intervention and not cure the rioting.

As diagnostic analysts, we see this situation almost daily in complex organisations. We hear about their problems finding the right employees, and how they spend a fortune on development, engagement and retention, but without the results they were hoping for. But when we offer to perform a formal diagnostic to identify the root causes of the problem, there is inevitably a Cameron in the company who tells us the answer is obvious and then proceeds with an intervention. Nine times out of ten, we’re back there within two years.

It is true that in non-complex organisations, the causes of problems are indeed usually easy to identify. But in large, global, multi-cultural situations, they are not.

Why do people fear diagnostic analysis? Some possible reasons:

1. They cost money, it is true. But they are usually cheaper than applying the wrong intervention.

2. Some people get systematic problem analysis; others don’t. I notice this often based on the looks of awe that I get when explaining what to me seems like a simple systematic approach to, for example, identifying the causes of employee turnover. I often wonder why the client didn’t think of it themselves, but the fact is that many people do not think this way and find it difficult. I suppose it’s good because that creates opportunities for me.

Of course sometimes even formal diagnostics can get it wrong, but one thing is for sure: they get it wrong less often than a superficial guesses as to the underlying causes.

View Rainmakers Bio »
Go to Source »

Superficial analysis and the wrong interventions

Max Blumberg

Labour opposition leader Ed Milliband says the UK needs a deep analysis into the real causes of the recent riots. But Prime Minister David Cameron says the UK knows the causes and all that is needed now is rapid action and intervention. Milliband responds to this by saying that Cameron’s intervention will be a knee-jerk reaction based on a superficial analysis of the situation, and which will result in the wrong intervention and not cure the rioting.

We see this situation almost daily in complex organisations. We hear about their problems finding the right employees, and how they spend a fortune on development, engagement and retention, but without the results they were hoping for. But when we offer to perform a formal diagnostic to identify the root causes of the problem, there is inevitably a Cameron who tells us the answer is obvious and then proceeds with an intervention. Nine times out of ten, we’re back there within two years.

It is true that in non-complex organisations, the causes of problems are indeed usually easy to identify. But in large, global, multi-cultural situations, they are not.

Why do people fear diagnostics? Some possible reasons:

1. They cost money, it is true. But they are usually cheaper than applying the wrong intervention.

2. Some people get systematic problem analysis; others don’t. I notice this often based on the looks of awe that I get when explaining what to me seems like a simple systematic approach to, for example, identifying the causes of employee turnover. I often wonder why the client didn’t think of it themselves, but the fact is that many people do not think this way and find it difficult. I suppose it’s good because that creates opportunities for me.

Of course sometimes even formal diagnostics can get it wrong, but one thing is for sure: they get it wrong less often than a superficial guesses as to the underlying causes.

View Rainmakers Bio »
Go to Source »

WHAT MATTERS MOST IS STARTING

Mark’s Daily Thought – Ideas from Mark Fritz to help you Get Ahead, Stay Ahead and Be Successful

Nothing started can ever be achieved. Many people never get what they want because they always have a reason to not get started. Successful people focus on the opposite…they focus on the reasons to get started, and this drives them to actually do it (and start). What are your reasons to get started?

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